Go! Go! Nihon blog

Tag: etiquette

How to
Japanese hot springs (onsen 温泉) have been enjoyed by the Japanese for well over a thousand years; in the days before modern medicine, it was believed that a dip in the onsen could cure just...
Japanese Culture
The word omiyage お土産 translates to “souvenir”, but the practice of giving omiyage in Japan is much more nuanced than your typical western ideas of what a souvenir is.  Giving omiyage is deeply ingrained in...
Japanese Culture
A lot of what you hear about the Japanese work culture tends to focus on one thing: the long, unrewarding hours and the overwork. But there are actually so many unique aspects of Japanese work...
How to
Chopsticks are the ubiquitous eating utensil in Japan, but it’s not just something you eat food with. Using chopsticks in Japan comes with its own set of rules and etiquette, which may not be apparent...
Japanese Culture
Japanese calligraphy is one of the most well known and popular of the traditional arts of Japan. It’s called shodō (書道) in Japanese, which literally means way of writing. Shodō has a very long history....
Food&Drink
If you’re walking around in Tokyo and your stomach suddenly growls, how about treating that hunger with some Japanese ramen? It’s savory, filling, and can literally be consumed whenever, wherever, and however you like it....
Japanese Culture
The concept of Japanese hospitality, otherwise known as omotenashi (お持て成し), has come to light recently. Though translated simply as hospitality, the word omotenashi has a meaning deeply rooted in the Japanese psyche. It’s not simply...
Japanese Culture
If you’re out and about in the summer in Japan you’re like to see people beautifully dressed up and enjoying the warm weather. But what is the yukata (浴衣), when do you wear it and most...
How to
In Japan, millions of commuters board trains and subways everyday, and if you’ve ever been on a train in Japan you know that it’s usually a very orderly and smooth experience. The train etiquette in Japan...
Learn Japanese
Getting the conversation started in any language or culture is important and saying hello in Japanese is no different. There are different forms, different levels of politeness and certain rules that you must follow depending...
Food&Drink
Celebrating New Year’s in Japan isn’t complete without taking part in the traditions, including enjoying a traditional Japanese New Year’s meal. Called osechi-ryōri (お節料理), this meal is all handmade, with each piece thoughtfully added with...
Only in Japan
Japanese drinking culture is just as good as you might hope it is. If you like a tipple then you won’t be disappointed. However, it’s worth having a bit of an overview before you get...
How to
Congratulations! You’ve got an interview scheduled. As with interviews anywhere else in the world, you should be prepared to answer some of the most common questions asked in a Japanese job interview. We’ve listed the...
Only in Japan
Education is a fundamental pillar of growth for human beings all around the world. Every country has its own methods in teaching and raising children in order to become a part of their unique culture...
How to
The Japanese job hunting and recruiting processes is very structured. Although there are strict rules, it makes it easy to figure out what to wear since there is an expected protocol on interview attire. This...
Learn Japanese
Many Japanese words and phrases are hard to translate into different languages, including English. As an English speaker, you may not have a specific greeting for before and after a meal, or before and after...
Japanese Culture
Whether you’re at school, work, a sports game or going on a date, the word ganbaru (頑張る) and its imperatives ganbare/ganbatte are used so frequently in Japan. But it’s a difficult word to translate into...
Only in Japan
We’ve all seen it — the photos with Japanese people posing with the peace-sign, or the V-for-Victory sign with one or both hands. The raised index and middle fingers, with palm facing outward or inward...
Japanese Culture
Shintō and Buddhism are Japan’s two major religions, with Shintō recorded as far back as the 8th century, although its existence has probably been much longer. Buddhism was brought from China in the 6th century,...
Learn Japanese
In the summer of 2012, I followed behind my supervisor as she walked me around to each department in city hall, allowing me to introduce myself as the city’s new assistant language teacher. I spoke...
Only in Japan
The Japanese bow is an important feature of the culture, and there is a lot of meaning in its usage. Japanese culture places heavy emphasis on respect, and bowing is one of the primary ways...
Food&Drink
Traditional Japanese cuisine is known as washoku (和食). The kanji characters forming the word is comprised of 和 (wa), meaning Japanese, or harmony, and 食 (shoku), meaning food or to eat. Wa is one of...
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Who we are

Go! Go! Nihon Live and Study in Japan!

In 2009, after meeting and studying at a Japanese language school together, Davide and John start working on a project that will make the process of living and studying in Japan much easier. The idea for Go! Go! Nihon is born. The service and website is launched with Italian, Swedish, and English language support. There is an immediate positive reception to the service and the first long-term students start the October session that year.

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